No credit card number fucking sites - Radiocarbon dating of blackened grains from the site

After his redating, Watzinger concluded that Jericho was unoccupied (and therefore obviously unfortified) during the Late Bronze period (c. City IV at Jericho – the city that all scholars agree was violently destroyed – was a fortified enclave, drawn at left.The city’s outer defenses consisted of a stone revetment wall at the base of the tell that held in place a high, plastered rampart.

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Because of its importance in Biblical history, Jericho was the second site in the Holy Land, Jerusalem being the first, to feel the excavators’ picks.

The first documented excavation was undertaken in 18 by the famous British engineer Charles Warren.

But did it really happen as the Bible describes it?

Continue reading The story of the Israelite conquest of Jericho (Joshua 2-6) is one of the best known and best loved in the entire Bible.

Above the rampart on top of the tell was a mudbrick wall which served as Jericho’s city wall proper.

The approximate line of this wall is indicated by the dashed line. This destruction, she concluded, was far too early to ascribe to the Israelites.

He dug from 1930 to 1936 and promptly published his findings in a series of preliminary reports. He also excavated a residential area on the southeast slope of the mound which he believed was part of the city fortified by the double wall.

Although the Second World War prevented Garstang from publishing a final report on his work, after the war, in collaboration with his son, he published a popular account that summarized his final views on Jericho. He designated this "City IV." It had been thoroughly destroyed in a violent conflagration.

Garstang excavated a collapsed double city wall on the summit of the tell that he dated to the late-15th to early 14th-century B. Garstang concluded that City IV came to an end about 1400 B. E., based on pottery found in the destruction debris, on scarabs recovered from nearby tombs and on the absence of Mycenaean ware.

He ascribed the destruction to invading Israelites.

A Neolithic settlement at the site goes back to about 8000 B. E.,* thus giving Jericho the distinction of being the world’s oldest city.

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